Eat This. It's Good!
Author Archives: Eat This. It's Good!

Super Simple Tuna Salad

On a hot summer day, this is a dish that leaves the oven off, yet it also delivers a great source of protein, loads of veggies, and is complimented with a healthy fat in the avocado. It’s a win-win. While easy to make, this dish is also very adaptable. You can add thinly sliced radishes, sprinkle on chopped green onions, or add crunchy jicama fries on the side.

Super Simple Tuna Salad

  • 1 can tuna, drained
  • ½ cup sliced tomato (I use cherry tomatoes)
  • ¼ cup diced red onion
  • ½ cup shredded carrot
  • ½ cup diced cucumber
  • ½ an avocado, mashed with a fork
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • Pepper, to taste
  • Paprika, to taste

Stir all the ingredients in a mixing bowl until well combined. I serve this salad on top of a bed of greens but it is so yummy it can be eaten alone.

Almost No One Gets Hired to Eat a Slice of Cake

Few of us have a job, what you do to earn money, that you absolutely love all the time. It is called work because it is just that, work. Comparing work to food, usually doesn't have us calling for chocolate cake. Work is like eating anchovies (unless you like anchovies).

There are ways to help make 'work' feel more enjoyable but that's another blog post.

Sometimes working at improving our health feels like we have to eat anchovies but it doesn't have to. Improving your health should feel more like eating cake.

Here are three tips to improving your health feel more like eating cake:

1. Small starts, quick rewards. Create a system where you and your partner have to do small tasks and in return you get a small reward. For example, I can and I will drink 16 ounces of water and then I will eat breakfast. Or I will plan my meals the day before so that I can make getting to work on time more achievable. The smaller the task, the better, so you won't delay starting. Also small tasks done consistently over time reap a big payoff.

2. Recruit a friend or family member to join you. Two is much better than one in many ways. Humans are social creatures and you can use that to your advantage. Agree to set daily or weekly goals, and check in with each other daily. Share the work and set rewards for hitting your goals. Encourage each other and help each other when someone is faltering.

3. Get excited daily. It's easy to be excited about a project or goal when you first start, but that can die out. Renew your goal each day. Start by setting a goal for the day that you can accomplish and that you care about. Find inspiration, visualize your accomplishment, find some music that motivates you, find an inspirational quote or video ... anything to get you excited to accomplish your goal for the day! Don't forget to share it with your partner.

Better health doesn't have to feel like swallowing your daily dose of anchovies, you can actually enjoy it.

To your best health,
Coach Nancy

Put Your Oxygen Mask on First

We've all heard this analogy, "When cabin pressure drops, put on your own oxygen mask before helping those around you". You have to be taking care of yourself first in order to help those around you be well.

But are you truly living it? Are you each day putting time into yourself? Or are you too busy? Maybe too much stress to fit in drinking water today? Maybe just too tired to focus on planning your meals today?

Could it be that you are telling yourself the stress, the sleep, and the to-do list is more important than you are to yourself? Are you allowing your schedule, work or situations to tell yourself that you are not worth it?

I hear it all the time, "I'm too stressed to eat good"… "I'm just too tired to focus on taking a multivitamin"… "I have too much to do to eat broccoli". 

What if instead you were honest and said, "I'm just not worth eating good food"… “I'm just not a member of society that is worth taking a multivitamin"… "I am not valuable enough as a person to eat broccoli and receive its benefits”.

OW, harsh, huh?

I know this journey is not easy, but take time to help yourself first so that you can take time to help others. You are worth it. I believe in your ability to take on better health for you.

I can’t take the stress out of your life. I am not able to tuck you in each night promptly at 9pm and ensure you’ll sleep soundly for 8 hours straight. I certainly can’t tackle your to-do list (you have skills I just don’t have).

I'm here to help you. I can serve you the tools, but you are on the front lines doing all the work/ Here is a list of tools I can open up to you:

  • The Grateful Plate website
  • 21 + Nutrition Challenge
  • Get Fit NH in Concord or Epsom
  • ProCoach
  • Essential Nutrition LIVE
  • Happy Healthy Lives- No Food Guilt on Facebook
  • Physical Preparation Coaching
  • Nutrition Coaching
  • A friend who understands but is also willing to help (that's me 🙂 )

You are valuable to me. Keep making it happen.

To your best health,
Coach Nancy

Mexican Cauliflower Rice

Last week I shared with you one of my favorite past S3 recipes that I love because it makes a lot, is easy to grab and go, and tastes great weather its warm or cold. This is another one of those recipes that I love for those same reasons.

Mexican Cauliflower Rice

by Coach Nancy

  • 4 cups grated cauliflower
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • ½ medium onion, finely diced
  • 2 medium plum tomatoes, small dice
  • 1 jalapeno, seeds and membrane removed, minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • ¼ smoked paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • Chopped cilantro

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the onions, tomatoes and jalapeno and sauté until just tender, about 2-3 minutes. Add the garlic and cauliflower, sauté until the cauliflower is just tender, 2 minutes.

Add the tomato paste, cumin, paprika, cayenne, salt and pepper. Stir to evenly coat the vegetables and cook for 1 minute or until heated through. Add chopped cilantro and serve.

Make Yourself a NOT To Do List

Recently, I was challenged to do a task that I knew wasn’t going to be helpful to me. It was a generic call out to a group. I thought through the reason that challenge was being given and then politely said, I wasn’t going to participate. I found a great coach who instead congratulated me on not doing the challenge.

I thought about how we all have this long list of to-dos that cause us angst as we struggle to check them off. It felt good to know I had some things already settled. I have some things in my daily routine that already help me.

What would be on your list of things NOT to-do?

For me, I shouldn't combine too many outside activities into one week. I can handle one outside- the- norm appointment without going a bit wacky each week. In my schedule, one doctor appointment or one speaking engagement a week, one out of office visit, or one trip to visit with a friend is comfortable. Trying to add more than just one thing can make me a bit bonkers.

For me, I shouldn't try to stay up past 10. I just shouldn't do that. I fall asleep any way so I don't enjoy whatever I am trying to enjoy.

For me, I shouldn't try to put my vitamins away in the cupboard. I need the constant reminder of them being on my counter in order for me to take them each day.

For me, I shouldn't make three new recipes in one day. I just don't have that extra time to spend in the kitchen.

For me, I shouldn't go to the grocery store while I am hungry. I am tempted just like most people by the wonderful smells coming from the bakery or the lure of chocolate at the checkout line.

What should be on your NOT to-do list?

To your best health,
Coach Nancy

It’s Time to Give Your Kitchen a Makeover

I use a simple system of red, yellow, and green lights to get our transformation started. Red light is food you’ll want to take out and not let back into your kitchen. Yellow lights are food that you might have questions on or that you know are not quite great but not quite labeled junk food – yet. Green light foods are those that you have been proven healthy for you. Green light foods don’t cause your system aggravation and unwanted side effects. They are foods that your body loves to have on your plate for health reason. Can you say zucchini and broccoli?

As each door of the cupboard, pantry, fridge, and freezer opens, take each food item out to examine under the Red, Yellow, or Green light.

Step 1: Red light = junk foods. Terminate.

Let’s start with your list of the obvious “red lights” from your fridge and pantry. This could include things like:

  • Chips
  • Cheese crackers
  • Chocolates or candy
  • Soda/sweetened drinks
  • Instant foods like cake mixes and mashed potatoes
  • Margarine and other processed fats
  • Most frozen dinners
  • Most take out or restaurant leftovers
  • Bowls of candy or other snacks sitting around
  • Flavored nuts (i.e. beer nuts)

But please make your own list.

Step 2: Yellow light = trick foods. Triage.

Trick foods are foods that seem healthy but aren't. They’ve gone from something good (whole, minimally processed food) to something that a machine has put out, full of sugar and chemicals, and/or something that’s had all its original nutrients stripped out. It could also be items that you have in your cupboard for other family members that seem to trip you up. Consider minimizing and/or eliminating these:

  • Sweetened yogurt and frozen yogurt
  • Breads and bagels
  • Other baked goods
  • Most breakfast cereals
  • Crackers, even the whole grain ones
  • Granola bars
  • Regular peanut butter
  • Fruit juice nad sweetened dried fruits
  • "Healthy" junk food (i.e. "organic" cookies, baked potato chips, etc.)
  • Alcohol is negotiable - many people keep it on hand for social events but don't often drink it; other folks will drink it if it's there

This is a list you are going to work through. Right now it is giving you something to think about.

Step 3: Check for stuff you might not have thought of yet.

This is even more challenging than the so-called “healthier” foods in the “trick food” list, because you don’t think about these things being a problem… or think about them at all. (How much time do you spend thinking about BBQ sauce, anyway?) Most of these just pass under our radar, until we read the labels and discover that they’re sugar and chemical bombs. Or just not “food” at all. This includes:

  • Condiments
  • Relishes, mustards and ketchup
  • Salad dressings
  • Bread crumbs, croutons, and other dried bread products
  • Processed meats such as hot dogs, bacon, and deli meats
  • Spreads such as cheese whiz or sweetened cream cheeses

Again, you don’t have to throw out everything. It’s not an all-or-none process. Just make sure yellow-light foods know they’re on notice and have to earn their rent.

Your red/yellow/green light items could be as simple as putting foods in these categories. For instance:

  • Does this food come in a bag, box or plastic package?
    Red light
  • Does it have only a couple of ingredients on the label?
    Green light
  • Can you pronounce all of those ingredients?
    Yellow light
  • How far away is this food from what it used to be? And do you even know what it used to be?
    Yellow light
  • Is this food perishable?
    Green light (just about anything good for you goes bad quickly)

Step 4: Green lighting the kitchen.

Let's work on forming the "green light/wanted foods" list to help you restock the kitchen.

  • Fresh fruits
  • Fresh veggies
  • Eggs
  • Canned tuna/salmon/chicken
  • Nuts/seeds
  • All the wonderful cuts of meat you buy at the meat market

Step 5: Now its time to get to work.

Option 1: Throw out (or give away) any and all red light foods.

OR

Option 2: Take all the food that is not going to support your health and put it in ONE specific cupboard. Preferably out of the kitchen, maybe even in the basement. If you are looking in your refrigerator, move those red and yellow items into the produce drawer. Why not bring all those wonderful veggies to a fridge shelf where you can see them? Out of sight out of mind should be a slogan when you are dealing with family member’s food. Try to make it as difficult for you to see and eat.

Now you have it - a simple plan of addressing the food in your kitchen. Red lights you get rid of or make it difficult to see. Yellow lighted foods are put on stand by, maybe even taken out until you know which direction they really belong. Green light foods should be easy to see and easy to reach for. They are what stand out most when your kitchen is made over. By keeping food that will help your nutrition grow in plain sight, you are making it easier for yourself to eat in health supportive way.

To your best health,
Coach Nancy

Egg Roll in a Bowl

We did S3 a few years ago and I acquired a few recipes from my team. I just had to share them again with you. They transport easily. They can be eaten hot out of the pan or served chilled. They work at a pot luck because they both make so much. This is here one of my all-time favorite recipes.

Egg Roll in a Bowl

by Coach Nancy

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 package coleslaw mix
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
  • 3-4 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1-2 teaspoons rice vinegar

Cook ground beef in a skillet until browned and cooked through. Remove from pan leaving the drippings. Add celery, onion and garlic to the pan and sauté until cooked and softened. Add coleslaw mix and continue to cook for about 15 minutes. Mix ground beef back in. Add the ginger, coconut aminos, and rice vinegar. Allow to simmer for 5-10 minutes and it is ready!

Tips for Healthy Eating While Dining Out

The Western diet of fast food, pour from a can or out of a box, heat and serve, grab and go is slowly killing us. All of those choices are of little value to your body’s health. They come at a high price in calories but in exchange for low nutritional value.

The term “Fast Food” is commonly associated with hamburgers, greasy French fries, and cola. However, popular family restaurant menu items can be ordered “to go” without waiting for their preparation or standing in a long line. You can even pay with a credit card over the phone if you’re in a real hurry. But, fast food does not have to be high-calorie and a low nutritional food choice.

Tips to help you choose well:

  • Know that an average fast-food meal can run as high as 1800 calories or more.
  • Know the nutritional value of the foods you order. Sometimes “good choices”, are higher in the nutrients or calories. Fat-free or low-fat items are usually higher in sugar and salt.
  • If you're having fast-food for one meal, make all the other meals that day contain the right portion of lean protein, produce, and healthy fats.
  • Know how your food is cooked. Chicken and fish can be good choices - but not if they are breaded and deep fried.
  • Avoid jumbo, giant, deluxe, biggie-sized or super-sized. Larger portions mean more calories, fat, sugar and salt.

When Dining Out...

Tempting menus, extra-large portions and festive atmospheres make it easy to overlook supportive eating. You'll begin to pack on pounds if you make poor choices a habit. It is possible to enjoy yourself and still make supportive choices. Following a few simple rules when eating out can make it possible to maintain your nutrition plan.

  1. Order food to go – Studies show that people tend to consume more food when they are not eating at their own kitchen tables. Take home and have the option of providing a healthier side dish such as fruit or vegetables.
  2. KNOW where you will go and what you will eat ahead of time.
  3. Avoid buffets – they are invitations to OVEREATING.
  4. CHOOSE wisely - use the guidelines of Supportive Menu Design.
  5. Ask the server not to bring the bread basket.
  6. ASK how food is prepared – ask for baked, broiled, roasted, poached or steamed.
  7. Don't be afraid to special order – ask for your vegetables and main dishes to be served without the sauces.
  8. Watch portion size – servings can be 3-5 times more than what you need. Pack half your meal to-go before starting.
  9. Split a meal with a friend. You’ll avoid the temptation to overeat.
  10. WATER - drink at least one full-glass of water before eating. You'll feel full sooner, you will eat less.
  11. Order an appetizer and a salad as your meal.
  12. Front load your meal with a nutritious salad or bowl of soup to take the edge off your appetite.
  13. Order sauce and dressing on the side – control calories and enjoy the taste.
  14. Order first. You're less likely to be influenced by the choices of your companions.
  15. Eat Slowly. Savor the flavors and textures of your food, and enjoy the company you're with. When you eat slowly, you give your body's internal clock the time it needs to know when you've had enough. Remember the hunger scale.
  16. Save dessert for later – a great trick to play is instead of ordering dessert at a restaurant, go somewhere else. By the time you get there, you will not be as hungry and will end up eating half or even skipping dessert entirely.

You can dine out while remaining true to your goals. The key is always to plan ahead, choose wisely and you'll find foods that fit into your meal plan.

To your best health,
Coach Nancy

Say Goodbye to the Old You

Here’s an experiment I want you to do. Write a letter to you, the old you, the you that is sabotaging your efforts to become better. The new you is struggling. Old habits and behaviors die hard, but it is time for them to go. Take some time to visualize what you’re going to say and why you’ll say it. It may be "go away". It may be "thank you". It may be "I love you and I'm sorry".

Remember that Old You probably had some reason to be there. Be gentle and loving, but firm and say goodbye.

I challenged a dear friend to do just that. See if you recognize yourself in her letter. Then take time to write your own good bye letter.

"Dear New Self,

I want my old self back, or at least a majority of her. I want the glass half-full outlook back. I miss looking upon any challenge and knowing I could figure it out if given time. I am not sure why this outlook slowly changed, but over the past few years it has. I know this approach to challenges may require more effort and time, and that it may seem better to walk away and give up without really trying. I don't want to waste time and energy. In the end, it is exactly the time and energy spent on tackling problems or questions and working until a solution is found that makes life interesting and meaningful. With less time working and thinking, life has become dull and at times pointless. Maybe if I had replaced that "free" time with other challenging tasks it may be different right now, but I didn't.

I want the fearless old me back as well. When did we become so afraid of going out and doing new things? Or even familiar activities? I never used to back away from trying something because I was afraid of getting injured or not being good at it. The fact that I probably would not be great at it was always the reason to try it and then practice it until I was great at it. And for as long as I can remember, there was very little I could not do well if I was willing to work at it. This included any sport, musical instrument, foreign language, even academic endeavors. When did doubt show up and ruin this way of thinking? I am not sure but I want doubt and fear of failure gone.

My old self was not perfect though, far from it actually. She was very demanding and did not accept anything less than perfection. So there has to be a blend of her demanding pushy style, with a hint of compassion mixed in for when things don't work out well. Dwelling on the numerous times I was not perfect, may have helped me work harder It is no longer helpful to me. In fact, the idea of reaching perfection can go too. I have always believed striving for perfection should be the goal, as long as I understood that getting there would not happen. Setting standards that high would help get me as close as I could possible get, but somewhere I started to believe I could get there and became disappointed with anything less.

I want my new/old self to have very high standards but reasonable goals. I can be ok with not achieving perfection, as long as my goals are still demanding and not easy. As long as I know I have worked my hardest at reaching them.

So this is the start, maybe other things will be added to the list but these are what came to mind first.

No regrets gong forward,
Me"

Why not write your own letter? Why not say goodbye to the old you and all the things that no longer help you. Keep those wonderful traits that will keep you moving forward. Those outdated habits, let’s send them away. Notice them, name them and pack them away.

To your best health, 
Coach Nancy

Sausage, Sweet Potato & Veggie Skillet

Rockstar Doreen shared this new breakfast hash recipe with me, and let me tell you - it is great! You will love it. It's easy to make, super filling and great for any meal or leftovers. I topped it with eggs for breakfast.

Sausage, Sweet Potato & Veggie Skillet

  • 1 pound ground sausage
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 pound Brussels sprouts, quartered
  • 1 large sweet potato, peeled and cubed
  • 2 tablespoons cooking fat
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Dash red pepper flakes

Preheat oven to 450 degrees and toss sweet potatoes and Brussels sprouts with 1 tablespoon cooking fat, sea salt and pepper. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and spread the potatoes and Brussels sprouts out evenly.

Bake sweet potatoes and Brussels sprouts for 20 to 30 minutes, or until potatoes and sprouts are soft and browning.

While potatoes and sprouts are baking, heat a large skillet over medium heat and add remaining cooking fat. Add the onions and stir, cooking until translucent and soft, then add garlic and red pepper and sprinkle with salt. Remove from pan.

Add sausage to the skillet and cook until brown and crisp, then remove from heat. Combine onions, peppers and sausage back into the skillet, sprinkle with crushed red pepper and stir. Cook until everything is heated through again.

Remove potatoes and sprouts from onion and combine with sausage mixture to serve. It goes great with fried eggs too! Save leftovers and reheat in oven, microwave or skillet.

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