Category Archives for "Recipes"

Yes, You can Eat Good at the Holidays

Christmas is a busy time of year. Don’t let it be an excuse to not eat healthy meals prepared at home. My favorite kitchen aid is my crock pot. It serves up delicious meals without a lot of fuss. Plus it makes the house smell good all day while it cooks. Here are three meals when served with a salad will keep you on track nutritionally.

Salsa Style Pork

  • 1 pound pork loin, cut into one inch cubes
  • 1- 20 ounce jar of salsa
  • 1- 4 ounce jar of diced green chilies, drained
  • 1- 15 ounce can of black beans, drained
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • Chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

Combine pork loin, salsa, chilies, and black beans in crock pot and mix well. Cover and cook for 6-8 hours on low. Sprinkle cheese and cilantro over top and serve.

Herbed Turkey Breast

  • 2 onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups chopped celery
  • 12 baby carrots
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1- 4 pound boneless turkey breast
  • 1- 14 ounce can of chicken broth
  • 1 Tablespoon rosemary
  • 1/8 teaspoon sage
  • 1/8 teaspoon thyme
  • 1/8 teaspoon marjoram
  • 1/8 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper

Place vegetables in the bottom of the crock pot. Top with turkey breast. Combine seasonings and chicken broth. Pour over the top. Cover and cook on low heat for 5-7 hours.

Sirloin Tip Roast with Horseradish

  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¾ teaspoon oregano
  • ¼ teaspoon basil
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼pound boneless beef sirloin tip roast, cut in half
  • ½ cup beef broth

Combine seasonings. Spread over roast halves. Place in slow cooker. Add broth. Cook on low 6-8 hours. Remove from cooker. Let stand for 15 minutes before slicing diagonally across the grain. Scoop juices from crock pot into gravy dish. Serve with horseradish if desired.

Enjoy,

Coach Nancy

Is it a good idea to exercise when sick? [Infographic]

​Good idea?  Bad idea? Can exercise actually help boost our immune system, even when we are sick?

​by Dean Carlson, Pn2


​It's not an uncommon question:

"Should I exercise when I am sick?"

Well, as with many things, it depends.

​If you are laid out in bed with the flu, the answer is obvious. But what about certain stages of a cold? While we don't want to share that joy with others, can getting some movement in be helpful?

Our friend at Precision Nutrition produced this excellent guide for sorting it all out.​

Print out this infographic for some very specific guidelines on exercise, and how it affects your immune system before, during, and after an illness.

​Reading that infographic makes me feel better already!

Want to share these tips with your friends, family and co-workers (especially the washing your hands part)? Click here for a fully printable version of this infographic.

​Here's to staying healthy!


What should I eat when I am sick? [Infographic]


​Are there foods that help me fight bugs faster, or help me from getting sick at all? Let's find out!

​by ​Dean Carlson, Pn2


​It's true. What you eat can have a direct impact on how quickly you recover from a cold, flu or other yucky thing that can bring us down and make us feel like doing, well, nothing!

It all has to do with your gut health. What happens in your digestive tract plays a huge role in how well you can fight off germs, or whether you come down with something at all.

​This infographic has some great tips for boosting your immune system, as well as helping you feel better faster.

​The take home? Take care of your gut, and it will take care of you! 🙂

You wouldn't want to keep this great info to yourself, especially when the men you know get sick (yes, we are babies). Download a printable copy of this infographic to share, it's the nice thing to do!

Calories count, but counting calories? Part 2 [Infographic]

Part ​2: Calories ​Out

Compiled by Dean Carlson, Pn2. Infographic created by John Berardi Ph.D. and Helen Kollias Ph.D.


​In Part 1, we talked about how "calorie math" doesn't always add up. This article looks at why accurate counting can be so complicated, and gives 4 reasons why daily activity tracking and trying to count the calories we burn on a daily basis isn't as straightforward as it seems.


​It's a question I get asked a lot by clients in our gyms. "How many calories does an average workout burn?" 

​The reason for the query is they want to plug my answer into fitness tracker software, in order to calculate how many calories they are burning daily, and thus how many calories they should be eating.

If it were only that easy. There are SO many factors that go into determining energy expenditure accurately, and unless you are measuring factors such as carbon dioxide output for the duration of training, you just aren't going to get a reliable number.

​ In my experience, most of the clients that try to track calories eventually get tired of doing so, or frustrated because it's not "working".

​Fortunately you don't HAVE to measure calories in and out all the time, if at all. The infographic below tells you ​some of the challenges with counting calories, as well as an alternative method to energy balance that you carry with you all the time. Simple!

Download your own printer and tablet version friendly copy of the infographic to pass around or keep for reference.

​Ever wonder why you track so carefully but you STILL can't lose weight? No matter how good fitness trackers are, they can't compete with reality. The most important measurement is the outcome you are getting from your current plan. If the results you are getting are moving you in the direction of your goals, stick with it. If not, it's time to do something different.

​Want more nutrition know-how?

​As I am sure I don't have to remind you, nailing our nutrition down is not as easy as "experts on the interweb" want you to think.

At The Grateful Plate, we work closely with our coaching c​lients to help them understand what is holding them back, and guiding them to building great eating skills and the habits to get lean, once and for all. When you are ready to take the next step, please reach out and let's talk.

Calories count, but counting calories? Part 1 [Infographic]

Part 1: Calories In

Compiled by Dean Carlson, Pn2. Infographic created by John Berardi Ph.D. and Helen Kollias Ph.D.


Most of us go down the "calorie counting" path at least once in our efforts to lose weight. After all, everybody knows "calories in - calories out" is the key to weight loss success, right? But is it that simple? This article and accompanying infographic outlines 5 reasons why all those food calculators may not be as helpful as we thought.


Actually the principle of energy balance does work:

Take in more calories/energy than you burn, you gain weight. Take in fewer calories/energy than you expend and you will lost weight.

It's not the principle that is flawed, it's the counting that is so hard to actually do correctly and accurately enough to make it worth while. 

There are so many factors working against you, on both ends of the energy equation - in and out.  Part 1 highlights the problems with "calories in".

Download your own printer friendly copy of the infographic right here.

25% Margin of Error?

That would make a very significant difference when trying to figure out while all those calories counting apps aren't really helping, wouldn't it?

Now I am not saying you have to never track your calories, but here are my recommendations if you do.

Understand the limitations of the methodology. If you are not seeing the results you expect, take another look at the infographic for potential reasons why. The important thing is results, not the actual number of calories the tracker says you are eating. If you are working on losing body fat, and it ain't happening, it doesn't matter how many calories the tracker says you are eating, you need to eat less.

There are times that I track calories, usually as a "sanity check". In other words I am not seeing the results I want, and when I track for a couple weeks it is easy to see why. I am usually eating a lot more food or a lot more times than I think I am. But even I don't want to reduce the enjoyment of eating to a math problem all the time. That's just no fun!

There is a better way, and it doesn't involve calculators and fitness apps. It's portable, reusable, and effective. It's the Calorie Control Cheat Sheet.

Stayed tuned for Part 2: Calories Out, coming up in a couple weeks!

The real cost of getting and staying lean [Infographic]


Is It Worth The Trade-Off? It's Your Choice.

by Dean Carlson, Pn2


We have a picture in our head of the "ideal body". But are the pictures in the magazines a realistic picture of what is achievable? Do you have to look like superman or a supermodel to be healthy? And at what cost?

Regardless of your goals, there is going to be work - hard work - to lose fat and get leaner. And there are amazing health benefits to doing do. But there are trade-offs, particularly as you get leaner and leaner. This infographic outlines them and shows you what's involved. We'll take a look at the extremes on both sides, and then have you consider what's healthy and achievable.

Click Here for a fully printable version of this Infographic.

For a complete explanation of the infographic, including a review of the research by our friends at Precision Nutrition, check out the accompanying article: The cost of getting lean: Is it really worth the trade off?

Cauliflower and Sausage Hash

We're continuing with my favorite cauliflower recipes! This one can be a side dish for any meal, or you can add a few eggs to it and make it your breakfast.

  • Ground sausage, browned
  • 3/4 lb. cauliflower, chopped into small pieces
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1/2 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 3 tbsp. water
  • Juice from half a lemon
  • 2 tsp. fresh parsley, minced
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil
  • 4 eggs, fried (optional)
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Cook the sausage in a skillet over a medium-high heat until crispy (about 10 minutes). Remove from the skillet and set aside. In the same skillet, add the cauliflower, garlic, and onion. Cook 2 to 3 minutes or until it starts to golden. Add the smoked paprika and season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the water. Cover the skillet and cook until the cauliflower is tender, about 5 minutes. Return the sausage to the skillet. Add the lemon juice and cook for another 2 minutes; then remove from the heat and sprinkle fresh parsley on top. Serve with eggs, or as a side for any meal.

Cauliflower Rice

Here is another of my favorite cauliflower recipes! This is a great side dish that is super easy to make and will go great with any meal.

  • 1/2 head of cauliflower, grated (I run it through a food processor)
  • 1/4 cup chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Heat olive oil in a large pan and start to sauté the grated cauliflower over medium heat. Add the chicken stock. Continue sautéing, stirring, until the cauliflower is al dente. Don’t cook it too long or it will turn to mush. I estimate this takes 5-7 minutes, but just taste it as you go and pull it off the heat when it’s done.

Stay tuned for more cauliflower recipes!

My Favorite: Cauliflower

My favorite vegetable this week is cauliflower. I have it just about every day. Yesterday I had it in cauliflower bacon hash for breakfast and at dinner I love Mexi-cauli Beef. It’s already in the oven along with broccoli and carrots to roast for dinner.

The Bomb Mashed Cauliflower 

  • 1 large head of cauliflower
  • ¼ cup cashews
  • ¼ cup water or coconut milk

In a large pot with a tight fitting lid, steam the cauliflower and cashews in water until cauliflower is tender. Drain water and transfer cauliflower mixture to a food processor or blender. Add coconut milk and puree (in small batches, if needed). Top with butter, salt and pepper to taste.

Stay tuned for more of my favorite cauliflower recipes! 🙂

Asian Slaw

Deb from Concord loves to experiment with new recipes. She received this one from a friend out west. This Asian Slaw recipe combines the tang of rice wine vinegar with the sweetness of mangoes, the slight zing of scallions, and the crunchiness of cabbage.

  • 2 cups shredded cabbage
  • 1/2 cup shredded carrots
  • 3 medium scallions, chopped
  • 1 mango, not fully ripe, diced
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1/2 lime, juiced
  • 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce (or tamari for gluten free)
  • 1 tablespoon peanut oil
  • 1 teaspoon black and white sesame seeds

Combine the cabbage, carrots, scallions, and mango. Toss together in a large bowl. Prepare the dressing by whisking together the rice vinegar, lime juice, and soy sauce. Slowly whisk in the peanut oil. Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss to coat. Let it sit at least 15-20 minutes to let the dressing soak in. Serve sprinkled with sesame seeds.

I made this and my family loved it too. I grilled up some chicken and used this as a side dish. It was even better the next day.

Enjoy great food that is great for you,
Coach Nancy

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